North East heroes back the Future Fund

Posted by admin on August 22, 2014

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Future Fund patrons (clockwise from top left): Musician Sting, author David Almond, businesswoman Margaret Barbour, TV writers Dick Clement & Ian La Frenais, Ray Laidlaw of band Lindisfarne, community champion Doreen 'Granny' Jardine, Ray Jackson, also of Lindisfarne, genetics expert John Burn of Newcastle University

Future Fund patrons (clockwise from top left): Musician Sting, author David Almond, businesswoman Margaret Barbour, TV writers Dick Clement & Ian La Frenais, Ray Laidlaw of band Lindisfarne, community champion Doreen ‘Granny’ Jardine, Ray Jackson, also of Lindisfarne, genetics expert John Burn of Newcastle University

A star spangled line-up of North East heroes has pledged support for plans to create a dedicated children’s cancer research centre in Newcastle.

Musician Sting and TV writing duo Dick Clement and Ian La Frenais of Auf Wiedersehen Pet fame are amongst a contingent of much-loved and respected names from the world of music, stage, business and community work to have become patrons of the Future Fund.

The Fund aims to raise £5.5 million to create the Newcastle University Centre for Childhood Cancer, a state-of-the-art facility where the city’s academics and clinicians can advance and accelerate the children’s cancer research and treatment that has already earned them international recognition. It is a collaborative project between the University, the North of England Children’s Cancer Research (NECCR) charity and Newcastle Hospitals’ Great North Children’s Hospital (GNCH) – home to one of the UK’s leading centres for paediatric oncology.

The nine local heroes to have thrown their weight behind the campaign are all either from the North East or have strong links to the region. The individuals, who all were nominated by the public as being some of the area’s most influential people as part of the NewcastleGateshead Initiative’s Local Hero campaign, are:

  • David Almond, award-winning author of children’s book Skellig, which was later adapted into an opera with Sage Gateshead,as well as a play and a film
  • Dame Margaret Barbour DBE, businesswoman who reinvented luxury lifestyle brand Barbour of South Shields
  • Professor Sir John Burn, Professor of Clinical Genetics at Newcastle University who was knighted in 2010 for his many significant medical advances.
  • Dick Clement OBE and Ian La Frenais OBE, screenwriters, film directors and producers who were co-creators of classic British comedies Auf Wierdersehen Pet, The Likely Lads and Porridge
  • Ray Jackson and Ray Laidlaw, of Newcastle folk-rock band Lindisfarne which went to the top of the charts with its much-loved album Fog on the Tyne in 1971
  • Doreen ‘Granny’ Jardine, community activist who has been making a difference in the neighbourhood of Blakelaw in Newcastle for over 60 years
  • Sting CBE, composer, singer, author, actor, activist who was born in Wallsend before moving to London in 1977 to form The Police with Andy Summers and Stewart Copeland. He has released five albums with The Police, as well as 14 solo albums and has earned a total of 16 Grammy Awards, a Golden Globe, an Emmy, and three Oscar nominations.

Launched just nine weeks ago (June 30), the Future Fund has already generated more than £700,000 towards its plans which will focus on developing therapies with fewer side effects and treatments for children with advanced cancer of those whose cancer has come back. The new celebrity support is not only expected to help raise the profile of the appeal, but also the running total of donations.

Explaining his support for the campaign, Sting said: “The research teams at Newcastle University are doing vital work on the development of more effective and less harmful cancer treatments for children. I am proud to lend my name to support the Future Fund campaign.”

On behalf of Dick Clement and himself, Ian La Frenais said: “We have both lived in many different places over the years, but the North East still has a place in our hearts. The Future Fund for Children with Cancer makes us proud of our links to the region. The work being done by researchers at Newcastle University’s Northern Institute for Cancer Research is hugely significant, not only to the families it supports regionally but also to the overall understanding of childhood cancer and how best to treat it.”

Overwhelmed

Professor Josef Vormoor, Director of the Northern Institute for Cancer Research at Newcastle University (NICR)and Honorary Consultant Paediatric Oncologist at the GNCH, is leading the Future Fund campaign and was delighted to announce the news of the new patrons.

“We are overwhelmed by the level of support we have had from so many celebrated friends in the North East. We are grateful to the University’s esteemed cancer researcher Professor Sir John Burn who helped galvanise the endorsement of fellow local heroes. I have no doubt that with their help and the generosity of the Great British public we will reach our target and ultimately give more children with cancer a future to look forward to.”

Professor Sir John Burn said: “Being chosen to be a ‘local hero’ was an unexpected honour. There are many people I would have chosen first, especially the kids who have to conquer cancer.”

The planned Newcastle University Centre for Childhood Cancer will be established in the heart of the Newcastle University campus and will help the city retain key staff and attract additional internationally recognised experts in the field.

How to donate

  • Via JustGiving
  • Call 0191 208 7250
  • Text NCFF01 and the amount of your donation to 70070.

Get involved

Get involved on Facebook, on Twitter @FutureFundNCL and use the hashtag #NCLFF

Other messages of support from the local heroes are below:

David Almond said: “I am honoured to be a patron of the Future Fund and to support the astonishing scientific advances being made in this great city. Having worked with children for many years, I know how important their formative years are. For families who are faced with this terrible disease, these years are coloured by the devastating effects of treatment and the knowledge that their child might not survive. The researchers in Newcastle University’s Northern Institute for Cancer Research are working tirelessly to develop more effective and less toxic treatments and to give more children a future free of cancer and the side effects of treatment.”

Dame Margaret Barbour said: “Childhood cancer has been one of the success stories of modern medicine, in large part thanks to the work of researchers and clinicians in Newcastle. The Future Fund campaign will enable this progress to move on to the next level. I am extremely proud to be associated with this vital work.”

Ray Jackson said: “I am proud to support the Future Fund for Children with Cancer. It is a truly fantastic campaign, raising funds for a very important cause. I am so impressed by the work being done by researchers in Newcastle University’s Northern Institute for Cancer Research (NICR). Some remarkable advances have already been made thanks to work done in the NICR, and this campaign will ensure that more children benefit from this wonderful research. I hope that others will join me in supporting the Future Fund.”

Doreen ‘Granny’ Jardine said: “The Future Fund is a great example of what our region does best: bringing people together to support a worthy cause. It makes me proud to be from the North East and I will do whatever I can to support the campaign.”

Ray Laidlaw said: “Fortunately I don’t have any personal experience of dealing with children’s cancer and for that I count my blessings.  During visits to the Great North Children’s Hospital I have met some of the young people and children who get treatment there.  I can’t imagine how difficult it must be to have to cope with a seriously ill child and I can remember vividly the feeling of admiration I had for the parents I met in the hospital and also for the courage of the children I saw toddling around, despite the inconvenience of attached tubes and drips.  The research being done at Newcastle University’s Northern Institute for Cancer Research is so important because it has the potential to make the whole process less painful, and the side effects of treatment less life-altering.  This is so important and I hope that the people of the North East will get behind the project and help the Future Fund to raise the £5.5 million it needs to make its plans reality.”

 

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